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  • Writer's pictureJean Kabasomi

Dealing with Distractions

Mark 1:21-27 - Jesus and those with him went to Capernaum. When the Sabbath day came, he went into the synagogue. There he began to teach. The people were amazed at his teaching. That’s because he taught them like one who had authority. He did not talk like the teachers of the law. Just then a man in their synagogue cried out. He was controlled by an evil spirit. He said, “What do you want with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are. You are the Holy One of God!” “Be quiet!” said Jesus firmly. “Come out of him!”  The evil spirit shook the man wildly. Then it came out of him with a scream. All the people were amazed. So they asked each other, “What is this? A new teaching! And with so much authority! He even gives orders to evil spirits, and they obey him.” (NIRV)


Devotional Series: Reflections on the Life and Words of Jesus




As we approach Easter, it is only fitting that we take some time to reflect on the life and words of Jesus Christ. In today’s passage, we see how our Saviour approached distractions. Jesus had just entered the synagogue and began teaching. The people who heard him were encouraged, strengthened, blessed and amazed by his teachings. He taught them in a way they had not experienced before, with authority. All seemed to be going well. Until there was a disruption - a distraction. A random man in the crowd interrupted his sermon. This was no ordinary man, but a man controlled by an evil spirit.


Mark 1:23 - Just then a man in their synagogue cried out. He was controlled by an evil spirit. (NIRV)


How did Jesus respond to this distraction? Perhaps, most striking to us is that he actually addressed the distraction.


Mark 1:25 - “Be quiet!” said Jesus firmly. “Come out of him!” (NIRV)


Many of us would have ignored the situation and tried to move on with our sermon or maybe asked for the man to be removed from the service. Instead, Jesus addressed the problem directly. He was both firm and direct in his speech. But he did not entertain or engage in an argument with the man. He looked beyond what appeared to be a man disrupting a service with questions to the root of the problem. His decisiveness and authority not only dealt with the distraction but also acted as positive witness to those observing him in the synagogue.


Mark 1: 26-27 - The evil spirit shook the man wildly. Then it came out of him with a scream. All the people were amazed. So they asked each other, “What is this? A new teaching! And with so much authority! He even gives orders to evil spirits, and they obey him.” (NIRV)


What does this mean for us today? When we are distracted by external forces as we go about our daily work, are there instances where we need to address these distractions head-on? Do we need to overcome our fears and walk in our Christ-given authority to silence these distractions? Do we need to move away from endless arguments and answering ‘foolish and unlearned’ questions (particularly on social media) and get to the root of the problem?


2 Timothy 2:23 - But foolish and unlearned questions avoid, knowing that they do gender strifes. (KJV)


Perhaps if we took this approach modelled by our Saviour, we might not only overcome our daily distractions more quickly and easily but also be an example of salt and light to the people around us.


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